Sword in Hand

Ewart Oakeshott was a friend, mentor and teacher in our education in the sword and its history. His last book was a look at the general history of the medieval sword as seen through anecdotes and interesting examples he had come across in his life long study of the blade. He was an accomplished author who had not only a scholarly approach to the study of swords but also the eye of an artist and mind of a technical illustrator.

Ewart Oakeshott

Sword In Hand expanded on some of his earlier writing and included some new pieces that had come to light in the years since his previous books. It was his "story of the sword" told in his personal style. It includes his personal insight on famous swords, some unique items he had discovered in his years of study, some of his personal art work and many images of swords.

 

Sword in Hand

When he asked us to publish this book for him it was a bit outside of our wheelhouse but we wanted his vision of it to be fulfilled so we worked hard to achieve what he laid out. He wanted large images that allowed people to see the swords he was describing and to include some of the details he felt were important in understanding the objects and their context. He was happy with the result and we are proud to have worked on it with him.

His books on swords and armor, taken as group, create a good indepth look at many of these items and in particular he lays out the base of the system for his sword typology, the most often used in the english language. His goal to create this system was to give scholars and students a way to clearly describe  a sword in all its important aspects via the written word. This was needed in the time before easy access to images that we all enjoy with the internet. Today's ability to use digital platforms for instantaneous sharing of such information makes it hard to imagine doing sword research by written letter and sketch.

 Oakeshott Typology image

Ewart's works were foundational to the modern study of the arms and armor of Europe. One of his colleagues once told me that if you glued Sword in Hand to Sword in the Age of Chivalry and Record of the Medieval Sword on the back it was best overall discussion of the medieval sword in print.

 

Some of Ewart Oakeshott's work.

The Archaeology of Weapons, a study and research, covering the period from the Bronze Age to the Renaissance looking at the weapons as a practical tools rather than objects of art. Illustrated by the author.

The Sword in the Age of Chivalry- a definitive and scholarly typological study
of the medieval sword which has become a standard work.

European Weapons and Armour - this is in effect the second part of the history begun in The Archaeology of Weapons, and covers the period from the Renaissance to the Industrial Revolution, with 700 line drawings (by the author) and more than 100 photographs.

Records of the Medieval Sword  Interesting and famous swords the author knew and studied. Kind of Great Pieces I have known collection.

Swords in the Viking Age, coauthored with Ian Pierce, published 2003.

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